Low Traffic Neighbourhoods suspended

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Annabel (admin)
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Low Traffic Neighbourhoods suspended

Postby Annabel (admin) » Fri Sep 11, 2020 4:08 pm

The LTN trials were introduced last month to make residential streets more bike and pedestrian friendly and to deter rat run traffic.

They were part of a series of measures introduced as part of the COVID response by freeing up additional space on the highway in support of social distancing and to promote alternative forms of travel as people gradually return to work.

 The trials also supported the council’s ambition of combating climate change by encouraging people to use more sustainable forms of transport and tackling air quality.However an initial review of the trials has identified concerns with emergency access and traffic flows.

And this has been compounded by additional changes that Transport for London (TfL) is making to red route roads in the borough.

These include significant interventions on the A24 (Balham High Road to Tooting High Street and beyond) including moving bus stops, installing cycle lane segregation, banning turns at a number of junctions and removing parking.

 The scale of these A24 changes coinciding with the council’s efforts to establish LTNs on residential streets has caused confusion and long traffic queues.

 Additionally, concerns around rising COVID rates and reduced capacity on public transport has meant that alternative travel options are limited for many people at this time.In light of these initial trial findings the council has decided to suspend the LTN trials.Wandsworth Council’s cabinet member for strategic planning and transportation, Cllr John Locker said: “We have monitored the traffic flows and listened to feedback from residents and businesses. We have also spoken to our partners including local hospitals and key services to hear the impact on them.

 “It is clear that the LTNs are not delivering the benefits we want to see. In fact it looks like the combination of changes in areas like Tooting, where TfL are making changes to the main high road, are unfortunately having the opposite effect. That is why we have taken the difficult decision to pause and re-think about how we can achieve our objective of delivering healthier, safer streets.”He added: “We all want to do what is right environmentally, whilst maintaining people’s ability to travel and making sure town centres and high streets function properly. It’s important that we listen to what people are saying so that we get this right.”

 The Council will continue to review the impact of TfL’s road changes to the A24 in Balham and Tooting to see if the issues improve over the coming weeks.

https://www.wandsworth.gov.uk/news/sept ... suspended/
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Punctured Bicycle
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods suspended

Postby Punctured Bicycle » Fri Sep 11, 2020 11:46 pm

Jo Rigby, one of the Earlsfield councillors, shared part of a message from Wandsworth council which stated one of the reasons the schemes were pulled was down to motorists driving on the pavement and instances of vandalism. It’s a shame that rather than tweak the scheme to try to find a good balance they just gave in to lawlessness and bullying. One shudders to think what sort of message this sends out :roll:

https://twitter.com/jo_earlsfield/statu ... 20769?s=21
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Denwand
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods suspended

Postby Denwand » Sat Sep 12, 2020 9:50 am

The LTNs were a disaster of badly planned schemes which did not foresee the obvious mayhem that ensued.

Jo Rigby is well known for her ideological views about vehicles.

Can anyone supply an example of the supposed vandalism?

Apparently some planters had their plants removed but little else...as for drivers driving on pavements - I never saw that happen in the Beechcroft LTN because WBC put bollards either side of the planters making this impossible.

There was one exception I admit - moped gangs could easily get through the narrow gaps and roam Beechcroft safe from Police intervention or through traffic to stop them - I know of at least one mugging that occurred to a woman on Beechcroft,

Jo Rigby has egg all over her face - The Police, NHS and Fire Brigade lobbied for the barrier removal THAT'S why they went so quickly and the expensive operation failed - her reasons for failure are laughable and designed to cover her own backside!

We NEED an intelligent solution to cut car use but this complete shambles was palpably not it! ...What is worse this dogs-breakfast of a plan will put back serious, intelligent Green soloution in Wandsworth by years!
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Punctured Bicycle
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods suspended

Postby Punctured Bicycle » Sat Sep 12, 2020 9:57 am

If the account from the council officer is inaccurate then I suggest you take it up with them.

Tooting, BTC, Earlsfield are made up of residential roads with families and children and many have suffered from years of rat running.

Perhaps a scheme like H+F introduced would be more effective in controlling the flow of non-local vehicles.

https://www.lbhf.gov.uk/transport-and-r ... ion-scheme
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Iris992
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods suspended

Postby Iris992 » Sat Sep 12, 2020 10:24 am

The bollards in Beechcroft were pulled down. I saw people driving on the pavement and shouting. I didn’t agree with the LTNs in their entirety but was looking forward to a sensible discussion about what works and what doesn’t work. I assumed they’d wait a couple of months to gather valuable data. Now those who shout loudest have had their voice heard. I wish I’d been a bit more aggressive in voicing my opinion!
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Londonista
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods suspended

Postby Londonista » Mon Sep 14, 2020 6:58 am

Well said Iris. My sentiments exactly.
It forced me to re-think the way I use my car, and as a family we now use our bikes a lot more. I would never have tried to cycle with my 9 year old on the roads before.

The current pollution levels locally are unsustainable, so in some respects I applaud WBC for responding to the dual emergencies of pandemic and climate change with a big bold scheme. I hope they try again now they have a lot of opinions and more data.
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BalhamBorders
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Re: Low Traffic Neighbourhoods suspended

Postby BalhamBorders » Mon Sep 14, 2020 9:23 am

Unfortunately this scheme merely displaced traffic onto the main roads and caused blockages and tailbacks.  E.g. on Sat 5th Sept afternoon it took 55 mins to drive from Tooting Bec station area to the A3 just past Wandsworth Common so we cancelled our appointment (ironically to look at a house outside of London because we wanted more space) and we turned round and went home again as we would never make it in time!  The pollution from all those idling vehicles (not all have an auto-stop facility) would have been far worse for the environment than what existed before.

Using emotive terms like 'rat runs' to describe people trying to get somewhere with their families e.g. Earlsfield/Wimbledon which is more difficult with all the roads off Trinity Road etc closed off - demonises those of us who need to drive somewhere and take stuff with us.  It's all very well to say you are a family living in a street which wants less traffic, noise etc but at the end of the day you chose to live in err, LONDON with 8.3 million other people and could likely afford to move further out if you don't like the trade-offs between convenience and population/vehicle density.  Most of those streets closed off have houses worth between £1m - £3m.  Other people aren't so fortunate.

I notice that the Greens in Streatham are now trying the same trick to close streets and already Garrads Road coming up from Bedford Hill is getting 1/2 mile tailbacks on some days.

As a cyclist as well as a driver, I love segregated cycle lanes too but equally they need to be proportionate to the space available.  Closing whole streets to cars is not the answer.

The moral of the story is that you cannot just impose change on people without consulting and thinking through the alternatives.  I am glad this heavy-handed scheme has been stopped and we can pause to think through the best options which will take time and participation.
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