Man on Bus

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dimelda
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Re: Man on Bus

Postby dimelda » Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:53 pm

TO:  South London Daddy:  thank you for your measured response.  You’re absolutely right:  one can’t realistically conclude that British schoolgirls are more at risk than their European cousins because of the uniform (& not because of other factors you’ve mentioned).   As far as I know, no proper research or blind studies have been conducted into the subject and, knowing the British Govt’s (& in my experience British parents’) obsession with school uniforms, there won’t be. But what we do have of course is the evidence in the 2018 Report commissioned by the children’s charity (to which I’ve referred) which specifically looked at girls in school uniforms, & which suggested that the uniforms definitely have something to do with sexual harassment & risk.  possibly a great deal to do with it. The stats are frightening.  This can’t be dismissed. It’s generally known also that a good deal of pornography involves women in school uniforms … there’s something about them that turns men on!  We might not like it, it's odious, but it HAS to be recognised:  in the case of schoolgirls, it can put them at real risk – why therefore force girls to wear them ? I personally have witnessed two incidents on local buses involving girls in school uniforms, in one of which I intervened & called the police. The girl was clearly distressed, the perpetrator pressed the emergency exit button & legged it, & the driver was utterly disinterested.  Passengers however were supportive. It has to be said however that a few, but not many, more enlightened schools in the UK in recent years have ditched uniforms, & we all know of the leading independent girls' school (in Hammersmith) which has not had a uniform policy for many years.  There is also the issue of cost – which can be prohibitive.  Save the Children has reported that there are children in deprived UK areas who are unable to go to school because their parents can’t afford the uniform &, incredulously, they're not allowed to attend without wearing one!
What sort of message is that giving out?  Possibly that the British don’t care about children.  On many levels, I personally think that uniforms should be abolished .... but I'm not holding my breath.
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SouthLondonDaddy
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Re: Man on Bus

Postby SouthLondonDaddy » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:02 pm

I am not a huge fan of uniforms, but not because it puts girls at risk - that may be possible but is, I believe, impossible to know with reasonable certainty, for the reasons mentioned earlier.

There are many reasons to dislike uniforms; I personally prefer a reasonable dress code. I do wonder what sort of repressed control freak thinks it's a good use of anyone's time to check, sometimes under the rain, whether trousers are the right shade of grey, hairbands are dark blue or navy, and bull**** like that.

The Sutton Trust is adamant that it cannot be concluded uniforms have any impact on academic performance.

I also despair at the kind of almost corporate bull**** you hear at some schools, about how uniforms improve learning, convey our values etc. I'd like school to teach kids how to reason with their own brain , not how to passively absorb total utter nonsense without questioning it.

Then there's the issue of cost you mention.

But none of this has anything to do with safety.
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dimelda
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Re: Man on Bus

Postby dimelda » Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:33 pm

They need someone like you  - possibly even you – at the Dept. Of Education – to knock their heads together.  I agree:  the sinister corporate control of some schools is terrifying.  You say you’d like schools to teach kids how to reason with their own brains.  Wooh – steady on!  That’s the last thing these schools want.  Knowledge is a dangerous thing.  It’s all about controlling minds, without debate or discussion.   Lastly, on the subject of this original debate:  school uniforms.  20 years ago, a teenage schoolgirl in the north of England, backed by the Equal Opportunities Commision won the right to wear trousers to school – but only after the threat of legal action by her parents against the school.  At the time, her mother cited sexual discrimination, her daughter’s safety & the cold winter months.  Only 20 years ago .. havn’t we come a long way since then.  But of course there is a group of schoolgirls today (Muslems) who, so as not to breach race or religious laws, are allowed to wear trousers, & not skirts.  But apparently it’s OK to force non-Muslem girls to wear them.  Such stupid rules, discriminatory, & possibly unlawful.   And on that note, it's been fun chatting.  Goodbye & good luck. 
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Scientist
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Re: Man on Bus

Postby Scientist » Mon Dec 09, 2019 9:07 am

As a parent to three children including girls, this is of concern to me. I don't really have anything to add to the advice already given, but something caught my eye which makes me a little sad: the notion that it it totally unacceptable for a middle aged man to speak to a school age child on public transport. Just think about that for a while. 
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Starr
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Re: Man on Bus

Postby Starr » Tue Dec 10, 2019 2:02 pm

Please do intervene if you ever see something untoward. As someone who travelled for 45/ 50 minutes to secondary school it used to happen far too much looking back. I do remember a man on a motorbike intervening when he noticed me and my sister being followed and harrassed and we were grateful. Also, it's impirtant to let the children know of the dangers of predatory adults early on, that way they can be more assertive instead of feeling confused and embarrassed if ever they find themselves in that situation, including someone pressing up against you in a crowded bus or train. It is a huge worry for me too as my daughter comes up to secondary school age. On the plus side you do learn to keep yourself safe and become streetwise, avoid certain quiet roads and cover up etc.

Hope your daughter is okay.
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